December 19, 2013

Team



We are now at the Swiss Center for Affective Sciences, Geneva University, Switzerland on Campus Biotech!

Check out our website: http://www.affective-sciences.org/en/home/research/affiliated-groups/cisa-affiliated-groups/affective-group/

Research Goals and Projects
I am interested in affective processes such as emotion reactivity and regulation in children, adolescents, and young adults with and without psychopathologies, including Autism Spectrum Disorder and Williams syndrome. The ultimate goal of my research project is to better understand psychological phenomena from an affective science perspective. The focus on emotional processes in psychopathology may help to better formulate treatment implications to improve emotional functioning in children and adolescents.

With my team at the  Swiss Center for Affective Sciences, University of Geneva, but also with my collaborators at Stanford University, we are currently working on the development of emotion regulation trainings for children and adolescents with and without psychopathologies (e.g., Autism Spectrum Disorder). For example, with my collaborators at Stanford University, we developed a parenting workshop to teach parents how to help their children with Autism Spectrum Disorder regulate their emotions. The team at Stanford University, headed by Yael Enav, PhD, is still recruiting parents who are interested in participating! Moreover, in a project together with Stanford University and the University of Luxembourg, we are testing the efficacy for a positive emotion regulation intervention for children, adolescents, and young adults with and without developmental disorders. Please contact alexandra.zaharia@unige.ch if you are interested in participating.

One important project focuses on the development of a board game to teach children emotion regulation strategies - check out our website on the emotion regulation game!

Other projects revolve around affective processes such as humor, positive emotions, and mixed emotions, for example, humor as an emotion regulation strategy or positive affective processes in Autism Spectrum Disorder. Individual differences and neural correlates of humor, as well as humor in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder has been in the main focus of our group.


TEAM
PI 
Andrea C. Samson, PhD
contact: andrea.samson (at) unige.ch



* Scientific Advisor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University 

see my current research interests




Team at the Swiss Center for Affective Sciences: 


*Alexandra Zaharia
Research Assistant and Study coordinator for the "Positive Emotion Regulation Training for Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults with and without Developmental Disorders (e.g., Autism Spectrum Disorder)





*Adam Lobel
Assistant and Project coordinator (co-supervision with Prof. David Sander)
We are working on the development of a training or game to teach children about emotions and emotion regulation in the school context.
see our project: https://sites.google.com/site/e3gamedesign/









*Katerina Giannadou
PhD-student (co-supervision with Dr. Elizabeth Milne, Sheffield University)
Katerina is focusing on oscillation patterns in individuals with ASD in relation to ASD symptom severity and repetitive behaviors.





In Geneva, I am collaborating with David SanderPatrik Vuilleumier, David Rudrauf, and Edouard Gentaz and their teams.


***

Collaborations with Stanford University

Yael Enav, PhD


James J. Gross Stanford Psychophysiology Laboratory, Stanford University










Antonio Hardan Head of the Autism Clinic, Stanford University Medical Center







August 27, 2012

Autism Research on Emotion Regulation at Stanford

News article about our latest research:

Autism Research at Stanford

1) Emotion Reactivity and Regulation in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Over the past years, we have collected data on emotion reactivity and regulation in children and adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder. We are now analyzing the data, but a few studies have already been published. We have gained a better insight into the emotional profiles of individuals with ASD and hope to be able to formulate implications for future interventions and treatment studies.

2) Parenting Workshop to Help Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder to Better Regulate Their Emotions

The team at Stanford University (Yael Enav, Antonio Hardan, James Gross), is now implementing In an collaborative effort the knowledge gained from the research study on emotion regulation in ASD in a parenting workshop that aims at improving emotion regulation skills in children and adolescents with ASD.  ****Study is open for recruitment****



October 11, 2011

Research Interests

My main research interests in affective science revolve around positive affective processes (e.g., humor) and emotion regulation in individuals with and without psychopathologies (e.g., Autism Spectrum Disorder, Williams syndrome). Moreover, I am interested in better understanding mixed emotions, and perspective taking processes (empathy/Theory of Mind). I use several methods such as behavioral, psychophysiology and neuroimaging (fMRI) to approach various research questions in these domains. Below you find more detailed information about some of them:

HUMOR: Humor is a very important and designating ability of human beings. Since several years, including my time as a PhD student at the University of Fribourg (Switzerland), I am interested in various questions related to humor and laughter-related phenomena, such as neural correlates of humor, how stimulus characteristics affect cognitive processes involved in humor as well as the affective response, how individual differences affect humor appreciation, and whether humor can be used as a means to regulate emotions and deal with adversities in life.

Affective processes in AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER (ASD): The number of children that get diagnosed with ASD is increasing despite the lack of a cure. In addition, there remains much to be learned about affective processes in this disorder, in order to better understand individuals with ASD, but also to support them better in their daily lives. I have studied positive emotions and humor in individuals with ASD (see special issue on humor in ASD), and most recently, I am interested in emotional reactivity and emotion regulation in children and adolescents with ASD compared to typically developing participants. Studying emotion dysregulation with multiple methods in a large-scale study, may ultimately help to better understand their strengths and weaknesses in the domain of emotion regulation, and also help us to answer questions about the effectiveness of treatment implications, what we can do to target emotional disturbances and how to optimize long-term outcomes.

POSITIVE EMOTION REGULATION TRAININGS: With my team at the Swiss Center for Affective Sciences, I am developing several training programs to teach children and adolescents about emotion regulation. One project is a psycho-educative emotion regulation training that is also tested at Stanford University and Luxembourg University. If you are interested in participating, please contact alexandra.zaharia@unige.ch.
Another training will be specifically developed for the school context in Switzerland. If you are interested in this training, please contact Adam Lobel.

August 1, 2011

Press releases





Stanford psychologists find that jokes help us cope with horrifying images

http://news.stanford.edu/news/2011/august/humor-coping-horror-080111.html

Press release



Stanford researchers investigate the emotional side of autism 



Press release





January 16, 2010

Publications

Publication List Andrea Samson (54)


See also on ResearchGate

Manuscripts in Peer-Reviewed Journals

Schäfer, J., Naumann, E., Holmes, E., Tuschen-Caffier, B., & Samson, A. C., (2016). Emotion Regulation Strategies in Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms in Youth: A Meta-analytic Review. Journal of Youth and Adolescence.

Samson, A. C., Dougherty, R. F., Lee, I. A., Phillips, J. M., Gross, J. J., & Hardan, A. Y. (2016). White matter structure in the uncinate fasciculus: Implications for socio-affective deficits in autism spectrum disorder. Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, 255, 66–74. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pscychresns.2016.08.004

Samson, A. C., Kreibig, S. D., Soderstrom, B., Wade, A. A., & Gross, J. J. (2016). Eliciting Positive, Negative, and Mixed Emotional States: A Film Library for Affective Scientists. Cognition and Emotion, 30(5), 827-256. DOI: 10.1080/02699931.2015.1031089. Epub 2015 May 1.

Kreibig, S. D., Samson, A. C., & Gross, J. J. (2015). The Psychophysiology of Mixed Emotional States: Internal and External Replicability Analysis of a Direct Replication Study. Psychophysiology, 52(7), 873-876. doi: 10.1111/psyp.12425.

O’Neill, A., D’Souza, A., Samson, A. C., Carballedo, A., Kerskens, C., & Frodl, F. (2015). Dysregulation between emotion and theory of mind networks in borderline personality disorder. Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, 231, 25-32. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pscychresns.2014.11.002

Pehrs, C., Samson, A. C., & Gross, J. J. (2015). The quartet theory: Implications for autism spectrum disorder. Physics of Life Reviews, 13, 77-79. doi: 10.1016/j.plrev.2015.04.025

Samson, A. C., Hardan, A. Y., Lee, I. A., Phillips, J. M., & Gross, J. J. (2015). Maladaptive behaviour in autism spectrum disorder: The role of emotion experience and emotion regulation. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 45(11), 3424-3432. DOI: 10.1007/s10803-015-2388-7

Samson, A. C., Hardan, A. Y., Podell, R. W., Phillips, J. M., & Gross, J. J. (2015). Emotion regulation in children and adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Autism Research, 8(1), 9-18. DOI: 10.1002/aur.1387

Samson, A. C. & Tornare, E. (2015). Perturbations émotionnelles et leurs remédiations dans le Trouble du Spectre de l’Autisme [Emotional disturbances and their remediation in Autism Spectrum Disorder]. Approche Neuropsychologique des Apprentissages chez l’Enfant, 139, 556-564.

Samson, A. C., Wells, W. M., Phillips, J. M., Hardan, A. Y., & Gross, J. J. (2015). Emotion regulation in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Evidence from parent interviews and children’s daily diaries. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 56(8), 908-913. doi:10.1111/jcpp.12370

Tschacher, W., Genner, R., Bryjova, J., Schaller, E., & Samson, A. C. (2015). Investigating vision in schizophrenia through responses to humorous stimuli. Schizophrenia Research: Cognition, 2, 84-88. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scog.2015.04.007

Manera, V., Samson, A. C., Pehrs, C., Lee, I., A., & Gross, J. J. (2014). The Eyes Have it: The Role of Attention in Cognitive Reappraisal of Social Stimuli. Emotion, 14(5), 833-839. DOI: 10.1037/a0037350

Papousek, I., Schulter, G., Lackner, H. K., Samson, A. C., & Freudenthaler, H. H. (2014). Experimentally observed responses to humour are related to individual differences in emotion perception and regulation in everyday life. Humor: International Journal of Humor Research, 27, 271-286. DOI: 10.1515/humor-2014-0018

Samson, A. C., Glassco, A., Lee, I. A., & Gross, J. J. (2014). Humorous coping and serious reappraisal: Short-term and longer-term effects. Europe's Journal of Psychology, 10(3), 571–581. DOI:10.5964/ejop.v10i3.730

Samson, A. C., Phillips, J. M., Parker, K. J., Shah, S., Gross, J. J., & Hardan, A. Y. (2014). Emotion dysregulation and the core features of Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 44, 1766-1772. DOI 10.1007/s10803-013-2022-5

Sheppes, G., Brady, W. J., & Samson, A. C. (2014). In (visual) search for a new distraction: The efficiency of a novel attentional deployment versus semantic meaning regulation strategies. Frontiers in Psychology. 5, 346, DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00346

Kreibig, S. D., Samson, A. C., & Gross, J. J. (2013). The psychophysiology of mixed emotional states. Psychophysiology, 50, 8, 799–811. DOI: 10.1111/psyp.12064

Lackner, H. K., Weiss, E. M., Schulter, G., Hinghofer-Szalkay, & Samson, A. C., & Papousek, I. (2013). I got it! Transient Cardiovascular Response to the Perception of Humor. Biological Psychology, 93(1), 33-40. DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2013.01.014

Mueller, S., Keeser, D., Samson, A. C., Kirsch, V., Blautzik, J., Grothe, M., Erat, O., Hegenloh, M., Coeates, U., Reiser, M. F., Hennig-Fast, K., & Meindl, T. (2013). Convergent findings of altered functional and structural brain connectivity in individuals with high functioning autism: a multimodal study. PLoS One, 8(6), e67329. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0067329


Papousek, I., Reiser, E., Weiss, E., Fink A., Samson, A. C., Lackner, H., & Schulter, G. (2013). State-dependent changes of prefrontal-posterior coupling in the context of affective processing: Susceptibility to humor. Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience, 13, 252-261. DOI: 10.3758/s13415-012-0135-5 

Papousek, I., Schulter, G., Weiss, E. M., Samson, A. C., Freudenthaler, H. H., & Lackner, H. K. (2013). Frontal brain asymmetry and transient cardiovascular responses to the perception of humor. Biological Psychology, 93(1), 114-21. DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2012.12.004

Samson, A. C. (2013). Humor(lessness) elucidated - sense of humor in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Review and introduction. In: A. C. Samson (Ed.) Special Issue on Humor in Autism Spectrum Disorders. International Journal of Humor Research, 26(3), 393–409. DOI: 10.1515/humor-2013-0027

Samson, A. C. & Antonelli, Y. (2013). Humor as character strength and its relation to life satisfaction and orientation to happiness in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders. In: A. C. Samson (Ed.) Special Issue on Humor in Autism Spectrum Disorders. International Journal of Humor Research, 26(3), 477–491. DOI: 10.1515/humor-2013-0031

Samson, A. C., Huber, O., & Ruch, W. (2013). Seven decades after Hans Asperger's observations: a comprehensive study of humor in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders. In: A. C. Samson (Ed.) Special Issue on Humor in Autism Spectrum Disorders. International Journal of Humor Research, 26(3), 441 – 460. DOI: 10.1515/humor-2013-0026

Schipper, M., Kullik, A., Samson, A. C., Koglin, U., & Petermann, F. (2013). Emotionsdysregulation im Kindes- und Jugendalter [Emotiondysregulation in childhood and youth]. Psychologische Rundschau, 64(4), 228-234. DOI: 10.1026/0033-3042/a000175  

Weiss, E. M., Gschaidbauer, B. C., Samson, A. C., Steinbäcker, K., Fink, A., & Papousek, I. (2013). From Ice Age to Madagascar: Appreciation of slapstick humor in children with Asperger’s syndrome. In: A. C. Samson (Ed.) Special Issue on Humor in Autism Spectrum Disorders. International Journal of Humor Research, 26(3), 423–440. DOI: 10.1515/humor-2013-0029

Korb, S., Grandjean, D., Samson, A. C., Delplanque, S., & Scherer, K. R. (2012). Stop laughing! Humor perception with and without expressive suppression. Social Neuroscience, 7(5), 510-524. DOI: 10.1080/17470919.2012.667573

Samson, A. C. (2012). The influence of empathizing and systemizing on humor processing: Theory of Mind and humor. Humor: International Journal of Humor research, 25(1), 75-98.

Samson, A. C. & Gross, J. J. (2012). Humor as emotion regulation: The differential consequences of negative versus positive humor. Cognition & Emotion, 26, 2, 375-384. DOI: 10.1080/02699931.2011.585069

Samson, A. C., Huber, O., & Gross, J. J. (2012). Emotion regulation in Asperger’s syndrome and High Functioning Autism. Emotion, 12(4), 659-665. DOI: 10.1037/a0027975

Samson, A. C., Lackner, H. K., Weiss, E. M., & Papousek, I. (2012). Perception of other people's mental states affects humor in social anxiety. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 43, 625-631. DOI: 10.1016/j.jbtep.2011.08.007

Samson, A. C. & Hempelmann, C. F. (2011). Jokes and cartoons with and without background incongruity: Does more required suspension of disbelief affect humor perception? Humor: International Journal of Humor Research, 24(4), 167-186. DOI: 10.1515/HUMR.2011.11

Samson, A. C., Huber, O., & Ruch, W. (2011). Teasing, ridiculing and the relation to the fear of being laughed at in individuals with Asperger’s syndrome. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 41, 475-483. DOI: 10.1007/s10803-010-1071-2

Samson, A. C., Proyer, R. T., Ceschi, G., Pedrini, P. P. & Ruch, W. (2011). Fearing to be laughed at in Switzerland: Regional differences and the role of positive psychology. Swiss Journal of Psychology, 70(2), 53-62. DOI: 10.1024/1421-0185/a000039

Samson, A. C., Scheuerecker, J., Schoepf, V., Wiesmann, M., Meisenzahl, E., & Frodl, T. (2011). Brain activation predicts treatment improvement in patients with Major Depressive Disorder. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 45, 1214-1222. DOI:10.1016/j.jpsychires.2011.03.009

Samson, A. C. & Hegenloh, M. (2010). Stimulus properties affect humor processing in individuals with Asperger syndrome. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 40(4), 438-447. DOI: 10.1007/s10803-009-0885-2

Samson, A. C. & Huber, O. W. (2010). Short German versions of empathizing and systemizing self-assessment scales. Swiss Journal of Psychology, 69(4), 239-244. DOI: 10.1024/1421-0185/a000028

Samson, A. C. & Meyer, Y. N. (2010). Perception of aggressive humor in relation to gelotophobia, gelotophilia and katagelasticism. Special issue, Psychological Test and Assessment Modeling, 52(2), 217-230.

Samson, A. C., Thibault, P., Proyer, R. T. & Ruch, W. (2010). The subjective assessment of the fear of being laughed at (gelotophobia): French adaptation of the GELOPH<15> questionnaire. European Review of Applied Psychology / Revue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée, 60, 4, 247-253. DOI:10.1016/j.erap.2010.07.002

Proyer, R. T., Ruch, W., Ali, N. S., Al-Olimat, H. S., Amemiya, T., . . . Samson, A. C., . . . Ruch, W. (2009). Breaking ground in cross-cultural research on the fear of being laughed at (gelotophobia): A multi-national study involving 73 countries. Humor: International Journal of Humor Research, 22(1-2), 253–279. DOI 10.1515/HUMR.2009.012

Samson, A. C., Hempelmann, C. F., Huber, O. & Zysset, S. (2009). Neural substrates of incongruity-resolution and nonsense humor. Neuropsychologia, 47, 1023-1033.

Samson, A. C., Zysset, S. & Huber, O. (2008). Cognitive humor processing: Different logical mechanisms in non-verbal cartoons – an fMRI study. Social Neuroscience, 3(2), 125-140.

Samson, A. C. & Huber, O. (2007). The interaction of cartoonist’s gender and formal features of cartoons. Humor: International Journal of Humor Research, 20(1), 1-25.

Zysset, S., Huber, O., Samson, A., Ferstl, E. C. & von Cramon, D. Y. (2003). Functional specialization within the anterior medial prefrontal cortex: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study with human subjects. Neuroscience Letters, 335, 183-186.

Monographs
Samson, A. C. (2009). Cognitive and Neural Humor Processing: Stimulus characteristics and Theory of Mind. PhD Thesis. University of Fribourg, Switzerland.

Samson, A. C. (2003). Humor und Cartoons: Der Einfluss des Geschlechtes auf die Stilelemente von Cartoonisten und Cartoonistinnen [Humor and cartoons: The impact of gender on style elements of cartoonists]. Lizentiat. University of Fribourg, Switzerland.

Book chapters
Samson, A. C. (2014). Brain, Neuropsychology of Humor. In S. Attardo (Ed.). Encyclopedia of Humor: A Social History (pp 88-92). Los Angeles: SAGE publications.

Samson, A. C. (2014). Psychiatric disorders. In S. Attardo (Ed.). Encyclopedia of Humor: A Social History (pp 600-602). Los Angeles: SAGE publications.

Samson, A. C. (2014). Characteristics of humorous stimuli. In S. Attardo (Ed.). Encyclopedia of Humor: A Social History (pp 373-375). Los Angeles: SAGE publications.

Samson, A. C. & Gross, J. J. (2014). The dark and light sides of humor: an emotion regulation perspective. In J. Gruber & J. Moskowitz (Eds.): The Dark and Light Sides of Positive Emotion (pp. 169-182). New York: Oxford University Press.

Beermann, U. & Samson, A. C. (2012). Humor: Haben Sie bitte Spass! [Humor: Please have fun!]. In: R. Zihlmann, D. Jungo, & Ch. Steinebach (Eds.). Positive Psychologie in der Praxis (pp. 68-75). Weinheim: Beltz.

Hempelmann, C. F. & Samson, A. C. (2008). Cartoons: Drawn Jokes? In: V. Raskin (Ed.). The Primer of Humor Research (pp. 609-640). Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.

Hempelmann, C. F. & Samson, A. C. (2007). Visual punning: merely analogical description or similar pseudological mechanism? In S. Attardo & D. Popa (Eds). New Approaches to the Linguistics of Humor (pp. 180-196). Galati: Dunarea de Jos.


Non peer-reviewed
Samson, A. C. & Beermann, U. (2006). Humor und Lachen: Wonach suchen Humorforscher? [Humor and Laughter: What are humor researchers looking for?] Psychoscope, 9, 10-12.